From the Interwebs: Plain Language, China Law, Tattoos

Here are a few of the pieces from the social web I enjoyed reading recently. I shamelessly stole the idea from Bradley B. Clark, who writes the Texas Law Blog. I don’t know who he lifted the idea from….

There’s always something interesting going on at Ken Adams’s The Koncise Drafter for folks who are into contract language. My favorite discussion this week was Excluding Consequential Damages in a Confidentiality Agreement. I usually use the word discussion when I talk about Ken’s blog, because his readers offer up thoughtful, stimulating comments to almost every post. If you’re reading the blog in an RSS reader, you’re missing out on a lot of the good stuff.

There’s been a lot of talk lately about how uninformed law school prospects are about the true economics of the law practice before entering law school. Toby Brown of 3 Geeks and a Law Blog fame said it well when he tweeted a link under his @gnawledge handle to a Thomson Reuters story about the ABA’s reaction: “Dear Recent Jobless Law Grad, It’s Your Fault. Signed – ABA.”

I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that my favorite post on the Internet last week, hands down, was Dan Harris’s reaction to my review of the China Law Blog. It truly made my day.

There are always good grammar and usage tips and resources flying around the Interwebs. Here’s a plain English guide to help you write more clearly.

Greg Bussmann, who tweets as @gbussmann, clued me into 32 More of the Best (And Worst) Tech Tattoos. Interesting. Amusing. Disturbing. What’s not to like.

From @AMDCPA came a link to Top 10 Survival Tips for Manufacturers. It’s worth a read for those who still make stuff.

This is one you might want to drop into Instapaper until you have a few minutes to think, but you’ll be glad you did. A Second Economy as Big as the First? will give you food for thought about automation and its effect on the economy.

In Category: From the Interwebs

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