February 2014

website terms of service

Dropbox revised its terms of service recently and sent an email to its users notifying them of the changes. I haven’t read through the entire ToS yet. But Bill Carleton’s post on his Counselor @ Law blog yesterday prompted me to take a look at the arbitration clause. I’m sharing my comment to his post here because I’d like to hear some contrary views. Let me know what you think in the comments or shoot me an email.

Here’s my comment:

Bill: When I read the bit about arbitration in Dropbox’s email alerting me to changes in the ToS, I assumed Dropbox was inserting a class action waiver in response to recent favorable court cases. Many companies have used such provisions to effectively insulate themselves completely from customer complaints. I view this as deeply troublesome, and I’m leaning toward hoping that Congress will overturn recent precedent by legislating consumer protections. (This is in contrast to my initial reaction to the cases, as reflected in my post AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion: Is Class Arbitration Dead?. My views have changed as the subsequent Supreme Court decisions have taken a different tack than I expected and companies have taken advantage of the decisions to the detriment of their customers.)

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Angel Investing Basics

by Brian Rogers on February 9, 2014

in Miscellany

Angel Investing

Are you thinking about investing in a startup company for the first time? If so, such topics as preferred stock, convertible notes, and dilution might sound like startup hocus pocus, but you’ll want to know what they’re all about.

In this post, I provide an introduction to several concepts that you should understand before entrusting your hard-earned cash to the founders of what might — or might not — be the next great thing. This post is a basic introduction to angel investing, which covers concepts common to most angel investments.

Startup investments are speculative and illiquid

True to my lawyerly training, I’ll start with the warnings: The first thing to know about investments in startup companies is that they are speculative. Many startup companies fail. This is true of those that gain early traction and successfully raise money from angel investors and venture capital firms, as well as those that don’t. When such enterprises fail, people who’ve invested in them can expect to lose much or all of their investments. So you probably don’t want to invest the kids’ college fund in startups.

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typesetting

Some people prefer one space after the period at the end of a sentence. Some prefer two. I’m a one-spacer myself.

After I read this Slate article written by Farhad Manjoo strongly supporting one-spacing a few years ago, I posted One Space, Two Spaces…Potato, Potahto? In the piece I noted that the AP Stylebook, Chicago Manual of Style, and MLA Style Manual all recommend using one space after terminal punctuation marks. I also explained my understanding of the evolution of spacing conventions:
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